GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP

GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP


https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP



GIMP Stands for ( GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free and open-source raster graphics editor, used for image retouching and editing, free-form drawing, illustration,  converting between different image formats, and more specialized tasks, its a basic use of designing and creating new design and artworks. 


GIMP is released in various for Linux, Mac OS & Microsoft windows.

GIMP was originally released as the know as  General Image Manipulation Program. In 1995 Spencer Kimball and Peter Mattis began developing GIMP as a semester-long project at the University of California for there graphics artworks, Berkeley for the eXperimental Computing Facility. In 1996 GIMP (0.54) was released as the first publicly available release. In the following year Richard Stallman visited UC Berkeley where Spencer Kimball and Peter Mattis asked if they could change General to GNU (the name given to the operating system created by Stallman). Richard Stallman approved and the definition of the acronym GIMP was changed to be the and know as GNU Image Manipulation Program. This reflected its new existence as being developed as Free Software as a part of the GNU Project.

https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP

The number of computer architectures and operating systems supported has expanded significantly since its first release& tested also and make many use and changes . The first release supported UNIX systems, such as Linux, SGI IRIX and HP-UX.Since the initial release, GIMP has been ported to many operating systems, including Microsoft Windows and macOS; the original port to the Windows 32-bit platform was started by Finnish programmer Tor M. Lillqvist (tml) in 1997 and was supported in the GIMP 1.1 release.

Following the first release, GIMP was quickly adopted and a community of contributors formed. The community began developing tutorials, artwork and shared better work-flows and techniques.

A GUI toolkit called GTK (GIMP tool kit) was developed to facilitate the development of GIMP. GTK was replaced by its successor GTK+ after being redesigned using object-oriented programming techniques. The development of GTK+ has been attributed to Peter Mattis becoming disenchanted with the Motif toolkit GIMP originally used; Motif was used up until GIMP 

https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP

The User interface of GIMP 

The user interface of GIMP is designed by a dedicated design and usability team to work efficetly . This team was formed after the developers of GIMP signed up to join the OpenUsability project and work tere daily basis needs. A user interface brainstorming group has since been created for GIMP, where users of GIMP can send in their suggestions as to how they think the GIMP user interface could be improved and use more efficienlty.

GIMP is presented in two forms, single and multiple window mode, GIMP 2.8 defaults to the multiple-window mode that can be privacy for the users. In multiple-window mode a set of windows contains all GIMP's functionality. By default, tools and tool settings are on the left and other dialogues are on the right. A layers tab is often to the right of the tools tab, and allows a user to work individually on separate image layers. Layers can be edited by right-clicking on a particular layer to bring up edit options for that layer. The tools tab and layers tab are the most common dockable tabs. The layers tab is helpful for create and edit efficently to the users that can eaisly be modified and can work in the systematic manners that is very helpfull features.

Features of GIMP

Color

Color is the base of designing without the color there is not a working. so the color is very IMP in GIMP the GIMP support the many color modes likes GIMP has import and export support for image formats such as BMP, JPEG, PNG, GIF, TIFF and HEIF, along with the file formats of several other applications such as Autodesk flic animations, Corel PaintShop Pro images, and Adobe Photoshop documents. Other formats with read/write support include PostScript documents, X bitmap image, xwd, and Zsoft PCX. GIMP can also read and write path information from SVG files and read/write ICO Windows icon files.




Selections and paths

GIMP selection tools include a rectangular and circular selection tool that can help to select the objects easily, free select tool, and fuzzy select tool (also known as magic wand). More advanced selection tools include the select by color tool for selecting contiguous regions of color—and the scissors select tool, and alsp make a good selection for the objects and the shapes which creates selections semi-automatically between areas of highly contrasting colors. GIMP also supports a quick mask mode where a user can use a brush to paint the area of a selection. Visibly this looks like a red colored overlay being added or removed. The selection is moslt use for becaouse there are lots of shapes and objects that make of the file part The foreground select tool is an implementation of Simple Interactive Object Extraction (SIOX) a method used to perform the extraction of foreground elements, such as a person or a tree in focus. The Paths Tool allows a user to create vectors (also known as Bézier curves). Users can use paths to create complex selections, including around natural curves. They can paint (or "stroke") the paths with brushes, patterns, or various line styles. Users can name and save paths for reuse.

https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP


Image editing

There are many tools that can be used for editing images in GIMP thats makes a good and attractive images. The more common tools include a paint brush, pencil, airbrush, eraser and ink tools used to create new or blended pixels that makes a realistic and organic images. The Bucket Fill tool can be used to fill a selection with a color or pattern and this is very easy to use and fill the color in stroke and fills the objects. The Blend tool can be used to fill a selection with a color gradient. These color transitions can be applied to large regions or smaller custom path selections.

GIMP also provides "smart" tools that use a more complex algorithm to do things that otherwise would be time consuming or impossible. These include:
Clone tool, which copies pixels using a brush and also make the clone
Healing brush, which copies pixels from an area and corrects tone and color this tools works better for retouching images 
Perspective clone tool, which works like the clone tool but corrects for distance changes its can easily crop in prespective
Blur and sharpen tool blurs and sharpens using a brush, also use for unwanted things that be blur
The Smudge tool can be used to subtly smear a selection where it stands and mix many shades in smudge
Dodge and burn tool is a brush that makes target pixels lighter (dodges) or darker (burns) it also do the reverse in the images 


Layers, layer masks and channels

An image being edited in GIMP can consist of many layers in a file or artwork area (Artboard). The user manual suggests that "A good way to visualize a GIMP image is as a Artboard of transparencies," where in GIMP terminology, each level (analogous to a transparency) is called a layer. Each layer in an image is made up of several channels and groups depends on us. In an RGB image, there are normally 3 or 4 channels, each consisting of a red, green and blue channel. Color sublayers look like slightly different gray images, but when put together they make a complete image. The fourth channel that may be part of a layer is the alpha channel (or layer mask). This channel measures opacity where a whole or part of an image can be completely visible, partially visible or invisible. Each layer has a layer mode that can be set to change the colors in the image.

Text layers can be created using the text tool, allowing a user to write on an image. Text layers can be transformed in several ways, such as converting them to a path or selection. that all the depends when its or raster or the vector images that are working. 

https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP

Automation, scripts and plug-ins

GIMP has approximately 150 standard effects and filters, including Drop Shadow, Blur, Motion Blur, brightness, curves, levels and many more option for the raster and the vector artworks designing.

GIMP operations can be automated with scripting languages. The Script-Fu is a Scheme-based language implemented using a TinyScheme interpreter built into GIMP for a great refference that work . GIMP can also be scripted in Perl, Python (Python-Fu), or Tcl, using interpreters external to GIMP.New features can be added to GIMP not only by changing program code (GIMP core), but also by creating plug-ins. These are external programs that are executed and controlled by the main GIMP program. MathMap is an example of a plug-in written in C or C++ The python also work in the script or the C & C++.


There is support for several methods of sharpening and blurring images, including the blur and sharpen tool. The unsharp mask tool is used to sharpen an image selectively — it sharpens only those areas of an image that are sufficiently detailed. The Unsharp Mask tool is considered to give more targeted results for photographs than a normal sharpening filter. The Selective Gaussian Blur tool works in a similar way, except it blurs areas of an image with little detail.



GEGL


The Generic Graphics Library (GEGL) was first introduced as part of GIMP on the 2.6 release of GIMP. This initial introduction does not yet exploit all of the capabilities of GEGL; as of the 2.6 release, GIMP can use GEGL to perform high bit-depth color operations; because of this less information is lost when performing color operations. When GEGL is fully integrated, GIMP will have a higher color bit depth and better non-destructive work-flow. GIMP 2.8.xx supports only 8-bit of color, which is much less than what e.g. digital cameras produce (12-bit or more). Full support for high bit depth is included with new actual Gimp 2.10 version. For accelerations OpenCL is available for some operations.

https://www.artistogram.in/2020/01/gimp-how-to-use-gimp-basic-of-gimp-gnu.html
GIMP | How to use GIMP | Basic of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) Features OF GIMP



File formats

GIMP has import and export support programming for Different formats such as BMP, JPEG, PNG, GIF, TIFF and HEIF, along with the file formats of several other applications such as Autodesk flic animations, Corel PaintShop Pro images, and Adobe Photoshop documents such as PSD. Other formats with read/write support include PostScript documents, X bitmap image, xwd, and Zsoft PCX. GIMP can also read and write path information from SVG files and read/write ICO Windows icon files.

Import only

GIMP can import Adobe PDF documents and the raw image formats used by many digital cameras such as DSLR OR lower this, but cannot save to these formats. An open source plug-in, UFRaw, adds full raw compatibility, and has been noted several times for being updated for new camera models quicker than Adobe's UFRaw support raw is the source.

Export only


GIMP can export to MNG layered image files (Linux version only) and HTML (as a table with colored cells), C source code files (as an array) and ASCII Art (using a plug-in to represent images with characters and punctuation making up images), though it cannot read these formats.



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